Tag Archive for: grand canyon locations

7 Hidden Gems at the Grand Canyon You Might Have Never Known Before

The geological marvel Grand Canyon is a wildly popular place. Wide vistas and majestic views attract over 6 million visitors each year. As a result, it can get a little crowded. But it does not mean that you cannot find some privacy there. You only need to know where to look. If you’d rather take the road less traveled, there are quite a few hidden gems of the Grand Canyon area. Here are 7 hidden gems of Grand Canyon we think are the best.

1. Grand Canyon East Entrance

Since the South Rim is where most canyon visitors tend to congregate, you’ll enjoy a bit more solitude on the east side. The famed Horseshoe Bend is visible from here, so consider this a trick to experience it without craning your neck around a sea of people.

2. Shinumo Creek

Shinumo Creek Grand Canyon
If your feet get tired from hiking, hop in a raft and explore some side canyons. Shinumo Creek culminates in a shallow, waterfall-fed pool that is perfect for splashing away the sweltering desert heat. The best part? You likely won’t have to share the space at all.

3. Blacktail Canyon

Blacktail Canyon Grand Canyon
Blacktail Canyon is another area accessible by boat. Unique, ancient rock formations and wildlife make the experience an unforgettable one.

4. Clear Creek Trail to Cheyava Falls

Paralleling the pristine Clear Creek, this trail takes hikers on an unforgettable journey across the canyon floor. It passes Bright Angel Campground, where you’ll encounter a few dozen people at most (and likely a herd of bighorn sheep). Finally, upon reaching the tallest waterfall in Arizona, its majesty will overtake your every sense.

5. Tonto Trail

While many trails wind through the Grand Canyon, they’re often plagued with bumper-to-bumper tourist traffic pretty much all year long. Tonto Trail in the South Rim is a 70-mile respite from the crowds. You don’t have to hike the entire thing, of course – just pick a segment and enjoy some solitude while marveling at the gently flowing Colorado River.

6. Diamond Creek Road

This road leading down into the canyon is so remote, you’ll need a permit from the Hualapai people to drive on it. If you so desire, there is a campground at the bottom. It doesn’t have facilities but is still a viable option for those who would rather not traverse the risky route back out of the canyon after dark.

7. North Rim

Grand Canyon North Rim
A mere 5% of park visitors gravitate to the North Rim, which is much cooler and features plant and animal life unable to thrive in other parts of the canyon. The views are incredible and your photos won’t be filled with strangers.

It is only open from mid-May through mid-October due to heavy snowfall during the winter months. The vistas are different from the South Rim with wide open space rather than views of the Colorado River.

So, what are you waiting for? Plan and Book Your Trip with Sweetours!

Contact us for further information
Phone: 702.456.9200
Fax – 702.434.7163
Email – info@sweetours.com

sources: onlyinyourstate.com, grandcanyonhelicoptertour.net

4 Grand Canyon Destinations You Must Visit. Contact SWEETours now for more information!

4 Grand Canyon Destinations You Must Visit

Even the most skeptical of travelers becomes awestruck at the sight of the Grand Canyon’s massive expanse of gorges, ridges and rock formations. So simply enjoying the view—from a variety of vantage points—is an activity that could take hours. One of the best ways to admire the canyon is on a hiking tour that takes you to the bottom.
For most people, a visit to the Grand Canyon is to the south rim rather than the remote north rim, approaching either along US 180 from Flagstaff and the south or AZ 64 from Williams and the west.

But south rim is not the only destinations at Grand Canyon. In this article, we have compiled 5 most visited places at the park, just for you.

Mather Point

Located on the South Rim and known as one of the best spots at Grand Canyon to take pictures, Mather Point is by far the most visited section of the Grand Canyon, offering many trails and overlooks, and all necessary facilities including hotels, shops, shuttle buses, and a historic railway.

On the south side of the Colorado River, the panorama at Mather Point extends from the lower end of Garden Creek taking in some of the Bright Angel Trail, over the deep canyon of Pipe Creek and eastwards to Cedar Ridge/O’Neill Butte, along which runs the South Kaibab Trail starting from the next point to the east – Yaki. Some of the Tonto Trail is also in view, near Pipe Creek. On the North Rim, the vista is centered on the long, straight Bright Angel Creek, flowing for 10 miles between a collection of tall red buttes and other ravines.

Grand Canyon Village

Grand Canyon Village is the most popular entryway into the park and, as such, often suffers from heavy crowds during the peak seasons in spring, summer and fall. But there’s a reason the area is so appealing. It’s home to Yavapai Point, one of the best places to view the canyon. If you don’t like camping but want to stay within the park, you should consider looking for lodging here. (Take note: Lodging within the park can be very expensive).

If you’re staying elsewhere, anticipate spending at least half a day visiting the village’s sights. Stop by the rustic Grand Canyon Railway Depot, which welcomes Grand Canyon Railway passengers to the village. Here, you’ll learn about how the expansion of the railroad had an impact on Grand Canyon tourism.

For authentic Native American souvenirs, head to the Hopi House, an adobe-style building representing a traditional Hopi crafts studio. Meanwhile, art aficionados should stop by the Kolb and Lookout studios for works of art inspired by the Grand Canyon.

Bright Angel Trail

Take this steep trail, which starts just west of the Bright Angel Lodge in Grand Canyon Village, to Plateau Point for some great views of the river.

But you should be warned: The Bright Angel Trail is a little more than 6 miles long one-way, and both recent visitors and travel experts say that attempting to hike to the river and back in one day is not a good idea. Make sure to pack camping gear if you plan on going all the way to Plateau Point and carry plenty of water with you – some rest stops along the trail only offer water seasonally.

For a unique Grand Canyon experience, consider traveling the Bright Angel Trail by mule. Riders are taken to Phantom Ranch for an overnight stay, with a lunch break at Indian Garden. While trips are usually safe, those who are not used to spending time in a saddle may find the ride grueling. The overnight, 10 ½-mile and 5 ½-hour ride costs $588.43 per person. Xanterra Parks & Resorts offers additional mule ride options that vary in price and duration. Visit its website for more details.

Grand Canyon Visitor Center

Who better than the Official Visitor Center to help you create the trip of a lifetime? This is where your Grand Canyon adventure begins.

The Visitor Center, located in Arizona at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon is the first place for guests to stop, both online and offline, to find the most comprehensive information to help create their Grand Canyon experience.

The local representatives that are on staff have lived in the area of the Grand Canyon for a long time and have experienced all that the National Park and surrounding areas offer. They are a great source of information and can offer guests excellent advice about traveling in and around the Grand Canyon areas.

SWEETours is currently offering a Summer Special on both our South Rim and West Rim tours! Talk to one of our customer service agents for more info.

So, what are you waiting for? Plan and Book Your Trip with SWEETours!

Contact us for further information
Phone: 702.456.9200
Fax – 702.434.7163
Email – info@sweetours.com

source: americansouthwest.net, usnews.com, explorethecanyon.com