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2 girls jumping at the grand canyon

Best Places to Stay at the Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon is perhaps one of the most iconic landmarks in the world – certainly in the United States of America. Set slap bang in the middle of arid Arizona, it is a bucket list destination for almost every self-respecting traveler.

A rare but beautiful landscape, the Grand Canyon spans an awesome 4,926 km². Many people tend to believe that the Grand Canyon is just one specific viewpoint, but how wrong they are. The Grand Canyon is, in fact, a whole national park area that is crisscrossed with hiking trails and bouldering routes galore. That one specific viewpoint, however, is Mather Point.

Welcoming in excess of five million visitors every year, the Grand Canyon National Park is very well set up for the onslaught of eager tourists. There are a hotel, motel and B&B to suit every budget and travel style.

Although the Grand Canyon is Arizona’s most loved landscape, there are a number of other beautiful national parks to explore in the state too. This one is really just the beginning.

Let’s take a look at where to stay in Grand Canyon and where else you can visit in the area.

Grand Canyon Lodge

This North Rim hotel features both basic rooms and cabins, meaning that everyone’s budget can be catered for; some rooms even feature views across the stunning canyon itself. Seasonal events such as outdoor barbecues are held here. The Grand Canyon Lodge also offers free shuttles to the Kaibab trailhead, making it great for hikers. As an added bonus, since children aged 15 and under stay free at this hotel, it’s a very good option for families.

However, this is the only lodge that offers accommodation inside the national park boundaries of the North Rim; therefore, booking a year in advanced is advised. Stay amid the solitude and remoteness in this historic lodge; choose from cabins and lodgings nestled among ancient trees around the canyon edge, and after the day’s hike you can dine in the lodge’s restaurants with magnificent views of the night sky.

Grand Canyon Village – Tusayan

Grand Canyon Village is the most popular place to stay in Grand Canyon and it is not hard to see why. This tiny township has been purpose-built for easy access to the National Park’s main entrance gate. Unless you camp inside the park, you can’t stay any closer than this.

Grand Canyon Village is home to just 2,000 permanent residents, who take great pride in living so close to this national treasure. In the town, you will find Hopi House, an interesting historical landmark well worth a quick visit. The gift shop is one of the best around and offers a wonderful selection of authentic Native American gifts.

By staying in Grand Canyon Village, you are within walking distance of trailheads of some of the National Park’s most famous hikes – Bright Angel Trail, Rim Trail and even Mather Point.

Naturally, no visit would be complete without a visit to the Grand Canyon Visitor’s Centre.

El Tovar – Grand Canyon lodging

El Tovar Grand Canyon first opened for service in 1905. The premier hotel and restaurant at the Grand Canyon were originally operated by the Fred Harvey company. It was designed by Charles Whittlesey (who also designed the Riordan Mansion in Flagstaff, Arizona). The El Tovar has been the most sought after lodging for over 100 years. In 2005, the 100th anniversary was celebrated for this classic historic National Park lodge. It was originally built to accommodate those distinguished passengers who arrived on the Sante Fe Railway. You can make the El Tovar a part of your Grand Canyon vacation if you plan far enough in advance. If you desire to stay at the El Tovar, we recommend that you call Xanterra Parks and Resorts at 1-888-297-2757 at least 13 months in advance. With the exception of January and February, the El Tovar normally books up 13 months in advance.

The El Tovar has 78 rooms. Each one of them is unique and distinctive. Interestingly enough, Charles Whittlesey specifically designed the El Tovar so that you would have to leave your room to enjoy a view of the Grand Canyon.

Tuba City and Moenkopi

These neighboring communities can be found on native Navajo lands about an hour due east of Grand Canyon National Park. Small but welcoming communities that are proud of their heritage ties, Tuba City and Moenkopi are a little off the tourist trail but well worth a visit.

For budget backpackers or road-trippers, Tuba City and Moenkopi are great places to stay in Grand Canyon, as they offer all the facilities you could need and are a gateway to some of Arizona’s best landscapes. The awesome – in the true sense of the word – Antelope Canyon is less than 80-miles north of Tuba City and surely gives Grand Canyon a run for its money.

There are some wonderful family-run diners to explore in Tuba City and Moenkopi. Even out here in rural Arizona, there are all your usual big chain fast-food outlets too, should you fancy something more familiar.

Yavapai Lodge – Grand Canyon lodging

The Yavapai Lodge is located close to a General Store, has a cafeteria-style restaurant, and is within a quarter-mile of the South Rim.

Yavapai Lodge is the largest lodge at Grand Canyon National Park with 358 rooms. It is located adjacent to the Canyon Village Market Plaza, and houses the Guest Registration Desk, Transportation Desk, Gift Shop and the Canyon Café. The entire complex is surrounded by Pinyon and Juniper woodlands, and is a half-mile from the canyon rim. The rooms are often referred to as Yavapai East and Yavapai West. Yavapai is a favorite destination due to the wide range of services available. The Market Plaza includes a general store, deli, bank and U.S. Post Office. The National Park Service Visitor Center is within a short walk — approximately a half-mile. You will also find a coin-operated laundry within walking distance of the lodge.

So, what are you waiting for? Plan and Book Your Trip with Sweetours!

Contact us for further information
Phone: 702.456.9200
Fax – 702.434.7163
Email – info@sweetours.com

sources: thecrazytourist.com, grandcanyon.com, touropia.com

7 Hidden Gems at the Grand Canyon You Might Have Never Known Before

The geological marvel Grand Canyon is a wildly popular place. Wide vistas and majestic views attract over 6 million visitors each year. As a result, it can get a little crowded. But it does not mean that you cannot find some privacy there. You only need to know where to look. If you’d rather take the road less traveled, there are quite a few hidden gems of the Grand Canyon area. Here are 7 hidden gems of Grand Canyon we think are the best.

1. Grand Canyon East Entrance

Since the South Rim is where most canyon visitors tend to congregate, you’ll enjoy a bit more solitude on the east side. The famed Horseshoe Bend is visible from here, so consider this a trick to experience it without craning your neck around a sea of people.

2. Shinumo Creek

Shinumo Creek Grand Canyon
If your feet get tired from hiking, hop in a raft and explore some side canyons. Shinumo Creek culminates in a shallow, waterfall-fed pool that is perfect for splashing away the sweltering desert heat. The best part? You likely won’t have to share the space at all.

3. Blacktail Canyon

Blacktail Canyon Grand Canyon
Blacktail Canyon is another area accessible by boat. Unique, ancient rock formations and wildlife make the experience an unforgettable one.

4. Clear Creek Trail to Cheyava Falls

Paralleling the pristine Clear Creek, this trail takes hikers on an unforgettable journey across the canyon floor. It passes Bright Angel Campground, where you’ll encounter a few dozen people at most (and likely a herd of bighorn sheep). Finally, upon reaching the tallest waterfall in Arizona, its majesty will overtake your every sense.

5. Tonto Trail

While many trails wind through the Grand Canyon, they’re often plagued with bumper-to-bumper tourist traffic pretty much all year long. Tonto Trail in the South Rim is a 70-mile respite from the crowds. You don’t have to hike the entire thing, of course – just pick a segment and enjoy some solitude while marveling at the gently flowing Colorado River.

6. Diamond Creek Road

This road leading down into the canyon is so remote, you’ll need a permit from the Hualapai people to drive on it. If you so desire, there is a campground at the bottom. It doesn’t have facilities but is still a viable option for those who would rather not traverse the risky route back out of the canyon after dark.

7. North Rim

Grand Canyon North Rim
A mere 5% of park visitors gravitate to the North Rim, which is much cooler and features plant and animal life unable to thrive in other parts of the canyon. The views are incredible and your photos won’t be filled with strangers.

It is only open from mid-May through mid-October due to heavy snowfall during the winter months. The vistas are different from the South Rim with wide open space rather than views of the Colorado River.

So, what are you waiting for? Plan and Book Your Trip with Sweetours!

Contact us for further information
Phone: 702.456.9200
Fax – 702.434.7163
Email – info@sweetours.com

sources: onlyinyourstate.com, grandcanyonhelicoptertour.net

winter hiking tips from sweetours grand canyon

Winter Hiking Safety Tips at Grand Canyon

While most visitors to the Grand Canyon experience its beauty in the spring, summer and fall, winter is still a great time to visit – mild temperatures in the inner canyon for the Grand Canyon hiker, fewer people, and the scenery is still amazing, especially when the rim is dusted with snow. It’s obvious that a winter hike in Grand Canyon is much different than a summer hike, and there are few things you need to know to help make your hike an enjoyable and safe one. Your clothing, food, and shelter are all critical elements that can make or break your hike.

To help you on your hike into the canyon, here are some tips for a safe and enjoyable Grand Canyon hiking trip, during the winter or whenever.

Clothing: Light but functional

Let’s start with clothing. Temperature and weather conditions can vary dramatically from the rim to the river. You are dropping nearly a mile in elevation as you trek down the trails. The difference between the temperature on the rim and at the Colorado River can range as much as thirty degrees. So on the rim, you may start with a thick fleece jacket, a parka, long underwear, a hat and gloves, but by the time you are halfway down the trail, you may be comfortable in just pants and a shirt. The lightweight and waterproof material is the key to ideal clothing. Although functional clothing has its price, the investment is well worth it.

The fiber content of your clothing is extremely important. You do not want to wear cotton. Once cotton gets wet, it takes a long time, which cools down the body temperature. Hypothermia is a very real threat during a Grand Canyon winter. Go with synthetic fabrics since they do not absorb water and dry quickly.

The right footwear is important

Before you start your hike, you need to purchase optimal footwear. Ill-fitting shoes can cause pain, blisters and a bad mood. Find a specialty store with a great selection and let the trained staff advise you. A hiking shoe for the winter should be waterproof with outer leather and breathable lining. The shoes should be as light as possible and not add unnecessary weight to your feet.

Another important item to have along are instep crampons, Kahtoola Microspikes or Yaktrax Traction devices. The trails at the Canyon can be covered with slick ice for the first mile or two or even more. It is treacherous and scary to be slipping and sliding while walking on the edges of cliffs!

However, the use of snow traction devices as those mentioned above, will allow you to actually enjoy hiking on the icy trail. No kidding! The Canyon Village Marketplace in the Village also sells instep crampons very at very reasonable prices. Check for availability to make sure they have them in stock. Their phone number is (928) 638-2262; ask for the camping department.

Hiking sticks are also very useful when hiking in mud and ice. In fact, hiking sticks can be some of the most useful items you can take with you on your hike! Read my Walking Sticks & Trekking Poles for all the benefits of their use.

Go on a guided hiking or backpacking tour

You don’t even have to read the rest of this article if you hire a guide – he or she knows the trails, knows how to stay safe, will be sure you are safe, is prepared before you even show up, and can even teach you a thing or two about the Canyon’s history, flora, fauna and geology. Most guide services will also supply the gear you need, so no worrying about being underprepared or forgetting the essentials.

Don’t underestimate the Grand Canyon or overestimate your abilities

Hiking the Grand Canyon is like nothing else in most of the rest of the world. There is a different dynamic in hiking down first, then up. If your knees and ankles don’t feel the strain of constant gravitational pull down the steep trails, you may unintentionally hike too far, forgetting that the hike out is strenuous. Give yourself twice as much time to hike out than it takes to hike in. If you hike out in is less time than expected – good job! – now take in the sites from the rim and enjoy the rest of your day worry and relatively pain-free. If you are a generally sedentary person, stick with hiking along the rim.

Eat and drink

Yes, it is cooler this time of year, but the desert is very arid and you will lose fluids quickly so be sure to drink water often. Also, eat! When hiking, you can and should take plenty of snack breaks. It is best to replace electrolytes with food rather than through electrolyte replacements such as Gatorade. Take these items as a quick fix, not as a replacement. The calories in food also warm you up as your body burns them, so even if you don’t feel hungry, the fuel will warm you up!

Follow trail etiquette for a safe and fun hike

Aside from many other hikers, especially on the main trails – South Kaibab and Bright Angel – there are also mules on the trails carrying gear and people. When you are approached by a mule going uphill or downhill, always move as far off the trail as possible to the inside of the canyon (by the wall of the canyon, not by the exposed area) to allow them to pass. Failure to move over can put you in a battle between mule and human – mule will win and human will likely be at the bottom of the canyon at record speeds. If you are unsure, listen to and follow the trail boss for instructions. When you approach other hikers, it is an unwritten rule to always yield to hikers going uphill. Uphill hikers are slower but are also moving steady and once you are hiking uphill, you will too find that stopping for the energetic downhill speedster makes it much more challenging to keep going (unless you need to take a breather anyway). You will find slow and steady is much better than fast with numerous stops. And for those of you going downhill, the hiker hiking uphill will be looking down most of the hike and likely wearing a brimmed hat. These two factors make it very likely that they will not see you barreling down the trail. In the case of ice and snow – slipping down the trail – so intentional, slower speed is better anyway.

So, what are you waiting for? Plan and Book Your Trip with Sweetours!

Contact us for further information
Phone: 702.456.9200
Fax – 702.434.7163
Email – info@sweetours.com

sources: explorethecanyon.com, hitthetrail.com, justroughinit.com

top reasons to visit grand canyon this year

Top 4 Reasons To Visit Grand Canyon

If you ever have the opportunity to, or the means to, visit the Grand Canyon. And not just view it from the top of the South Rim, like so many others do on their road trips across the West — don’t just stop for a day, take some photos, buy some souvenirs, and leave. Really visit it; spend a week in the Canyon’s depths and caverns, sleeping on sand that has been formed over centuries, being born again as you bathe in the pure, icy blue of the Colorado River. Get to know her crevices and caves, the texture of her rock, the location of her hidden waterfalls and beaches. Feel the power and soul of mile-high walls!

Fun fact: Did you know that the Grand Canyon creates its own weather? Elevation changes influence temperature and precipitation. So, if the temperature is really low at one point, just 8 miles away, it could be the hottest. The canyon surprises its visitors in many other ways.

Let’s take a look at the key reasons why this is a must-visit destination.

Scenic Beauty

This one may seem like a no-brainer, but the natural beauty of the Grand Canyon can’t be emphasized enough.

The Grand Canyon was declared as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for being one of the most spectacular places in the world. No photographs or descriptions can ever completely describe the timeless beauty of the canyon. The stunning visual changes and the vastness can only be experienced. It stretches for more than 100 miles and is nothing less than a truly American experience.

Iconic Activities

You can hike for miles here since most of the area has been left in its pristine natural state. Colorado offers rafting opportunities, giving you the chance to get a whole different perspective of the vast canyon as you raft down the river. Helicopter rides are also offered to tourists for that perfect bird’s eye view of the canyon. Apart from these, the Grand Canyon Railway offers rides between Arizona, Williams and the South Rim. The railway line stretches across 64 miles and offers stunning views of the canyon, creating a memorable experience. You can also explore the South Rim on a bicycle.

It’s Great Exercise

Visiting the Grand Canyon offers abundant opportunities to get out in the fresh air and get some exercise. You can go hiking, horseback or burro riding, rafting, swimming, or simply go for a leisurely walk if strenuous activities aren’t on your agenda.

Camping Opportunities

The Grand Canyon National Park offers camping opportunities for tourists from all across the globe. There are multiple places you can choose for overnight camping, such as Tuweep Campground, North Rim of Grand Canyon, outside Mather campground and more. At the North Rim, you can also experience ski camping.

BONUS: It Makes an Excellent Day Trip

Residents of apartments in Flagstaff, Arizona, can drive to the Grand Canyon in a matter of several hours, making it an ideal road trip for those seeking an excellent experience but are short on time. You can pack a picnic lunch to enjoy when you reach your destination, or you can dine at one of the fine restaurants near the Grand Canyon.

So, what are you waiting for? Plan and Book Your Trip with Sweetours!

Contact us for further information
Phone: 702.456.9200
Fax – 702.434.7163
Email – info@sweetours.com

sources: pineviewvillagesite.com, medium.com, thoughtcatalog.com

Grand Canyon: Prevention and First Aid Tips

At Grand Canyon: Prevention and First Aid Tips

Here is the full guide on how not to die at Grand Canyon, by Thomas M. Myers, MD (author of Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon). Get your own copy now — Click here.

First Aid

Shock

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Lightheadedness/dizziness; clammy, pale, or gray skin; rapid, shallow breathing; rapid, weak pulse; anxiety; drowsiness to a gradual loss of consciousness.

DO THIS:

First aid tips for shocked victimes

1. Calm the victim.
2. Place in shock position (flat on the back, legs elevated 8 to 12 inches) unless there is uncontrolled bleeding or a possible head or spinal injury, or if it causes more distress or breathing difficulty. Cover with a blanket.
3. Assess and treat the underlying cause.
4. Give clear fluids if the victim is able to swallow and appears dehydrated, but do not give food.
5. Evacuate to a local hospital.

Heat Illness (Dehydration/Heat Exhaustion/Heat Stroke)

Watch out! Early on, this problem can appear similar to water intoxication. Typically takes several hours to develop. Words in bold represent differences between the two.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Mild: Headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting/dry heaves, weakness, thirst, irritability, decreased urination.
Moderate: Lightheadedness/dizziness, worse with standing; warm to hot clammy skin; rapid, weak pulse; anxiety.
Severe (Heatstroke): Hot sweaty/dry skin; rapid, shallow respiration; rapid, weak pulse; confusion; unresponsive, abnormal body posturing (stiffening, arching, seizures).

DO THIS:

Ask about total fluid intake before giving fluids. If it sounds low for the conditions (e.g., < ¼ to 1/3 liter or 1 to 1 ½ cups per hour over several hours for an average-size adult hiking in hot weather), and signs and symptoms support it, treat as dehydration/heat illness. If in doubt, do not give fluids until the condition can be more accurately assessed.

Mild to Moderate:
1. Encourage the victim to stop and rest immediately (in shade during hot weather).
2. Douse head and skin with water to cool down and decrease sweat loss.
3. Provide fluids as tolerated; do not force.* Wait for 15 to 20 minutes if vomiting.
4. If the victim displays signs of shock, place in shock position.
5. Evacuate if condition worsens.
*Consider water intoxication before giving fluids!

Severe (Heatstroke):
1. Begin immediate cooling. Submerge body in cold water (creek or Colorado River) if possible, while protecting head and airway.
2. Do not give fluids.
3. Arrange immediate evacuation.
4. Start CPR if needed.

Water Intoxication (Hyponatremia)

Watch out! Early on, this problem can appear similar to heat illness. Words in bold represent differences between the two.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Early: Headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting fluid (initially), bloated feeling, weakness, no thirst, irritability, excessive urination.
Moderate: Lightheadedness/dizziness, worsening headache (may feel worse lying flat), clammy skin, normal to rapid pulse, anxiety, confusion, trouble speaking, blank stare, paradoxical decrease in or absence of urination.
Severe: Grand mal seizures, erratic breathing, unresponsive.

DO THIS:

Ask about total fluid intake before giving fluids. If it sounds high (e.g., > ¾ to 1 liter or 3 to 4 cups per hour over several hours for an average-size adult) and signs and symptoms support it, treat as hyponatremia.

Early to Moderate:
1. Encourage the victim to stop drinking and rest immediately in shade.
2. Douse skin with cool water to stop further salt loss via sweat.
3. Do not give victim fluids. Provide salty snacks and restrict fluids until symptoms improve and urination is normal (this may take several hours).
4. Evacuate if conditions worsen.

Severe:
1. Start immediate cooling if heat illness is suspected.
2. Do not give fluids.
3. Arrange immediate evacuation.
4. Start CPR if needed.

Broken Bones, Dislocations, Sprains/Strains

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Usually related to direct blow, fall, or twist. All: Sudden, sharp pain; pain with movement and/or swelling; bruising; numbness; tingling (often but not always). Broken Bones: Audible snap or crack, deformity, crunching or crackling sounds and point tenderness over the bone (associated wound or break in skin indicates open, or compound, fracture). Dislocations: Deformity, pop or clunk in joint. Sprains/Strains: Pop or clunk in joint, localized muscle or tendon pain/tenderness.

DO THIS:

White gold wedding rings
1. Support the injured area to limit use and movement.
2. Clean and apply the dressing to any visible wound (see Wound Care).
3. Pad area around the injury (use soft material).
4. Splint significant injuries in the position you find them (do not attempt to straighten an angles injury): place rigid support on both sides, immobilizing the joints above and below (improvise with materials at hand); adjust for comfort.
5. Secure splint with gauze, cloth, belt, or laces.
6. Elevate and apply cold pack/ice if available, 20 minutes per hour.
7. Arrange immediate evacuation.

Wounds

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Visible bleeding, tearing, gaping, or loss of skin. Subcutaneous fat or other tissues may be visible.

DO THIS:

1. To protect yourself from blood-borne infection, wear gloves (if none are available, improvise with plastic bags).
2. Expose wound to evaluate the severity of the injury.
3. Control bleeding. Using a sterile gauze pad, apply direct pressure on the wound for 5 to 10 minutes.
4. Once bleeding is controlled, gently clean around wound with an antibacterial agent if available (e.g., povidone-iodine, soap); do not get disinfectant in the wound.
5. Irrigate with the cleanest water available (do not irrigate puncture wounds).
6. Apply topical antibiotic and sterile/clean dressing (if available) and keep dressing clean and dry.
7. For minor wounds, cleanse and replace dressing daily.
8. Evacuate if the wound is large, gaping, or highly contaminated; a deep puncture; potentially disfiguring; involves joints or possibly internal organs; or if it becomes infected (e.g., warm, red, swollen, pus begins to drain, the victim develops fever).

Near Drowning/Cold-Water Immersion

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Difficulty breathing, coughing, dizziness, altered level of consciousness, nausea and vomiting, pale skin, shivering.

DO THIS:

1. Pull victim from the water (do not enter the Colorado River without a life jacket and lifeline to on-shore support).
2. Remove cold, wet clothing to avoid hypothermia.
3. Wrap in warm sleeping bag or blanket.
4. If the victim displays signs of shock, place in shock position.
5. Give clear, warm fluids if the victim is able to swallow, but do not give food.
6. Evacuate if the victim has trouble breathing, shortness of breath, or goes into shock.
7. If required, CPR can be initiated up to 60 minutes after the incident and should continue until the victim has been warmed.

Heart Attack

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Chest pain (squeezing, pressure, heaviness); shortness of breath; nausea and vomiting; pale, gray skin and/or sweating; anxiety; dizziness.

DO THIS:

1. The victim should stop and rest immediately (in shade during hot weather).
2. Place the victim in a sitting, partially inclined position or position of best comfort.
3. Help the victim remains calm.
4. Give one full aspirin (325 mg) or 4 low-dose/baby aspirin (81 mg each) if available; have victim chew and swallow.
5. Monitor airway and breathing (start chest compression if the victim becomes unresponsive and you can’t find a pulse).
6. Allow victim to sit up if tolerated and if it helps to breathe.
7. Place in shock position if signs of shock.
8. Evacuate immediately.

Rattlesnake Bites*

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Fang (bite) marks; immediate burning and stinging; immediate swelling; oozing of fluid, non-clotting blood; bruising at site, migrating up extremity. Severe symptoms may include shortness of breath; nausea and vomiting; pale, gray, and/or sweating skin; anxiety, dizziness.

DO THIS:

1. Retreating slowly, move victim away from the snake. (Do not attempt to kill the snake! Even decapitated heads can reflex-bite for 20-60 minutes after death, causing further envenomation.)
2. Place the victim in a sitting, partially inclined position or position of best comfort.
3. Calm the victim.
4. Cleanse the area around the bite wound thoroughly with soap and water. Do not cut or apply suction devices to the bite or place constriction bands above the bite.
5. If the victim is wearing jewelry on the affected extremity, remove before swelling sets in.
6. Splint bitten extremity to limit use, and periodically measure girth to help gauge severity and how rapid envenomation is spreading.
7. Position affected extremity level with the heart.
8. Evacuate immediately for possible antivenom therapy. Tissue damage can be permanent and may be minimized with treatment. Time is an issue! If you are the victim and are alone, attempt to hike out or go for help.
*25 percent of bites are “dry” (no venom injected).

Scorpion Stings

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Tingling, throbbing, nerve pain extending from sting site (tapping on sting site sends shock wave of pain up nerve), anxiety, apprehension. An infant or small child may have roving eyes or trouble breathing, be restless, or drool.

DO THIS:

1. Calm the victim.
2. Treat pain with an age-appropriate dose of acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin).
3. A cold compress may help.
4. Limit activity pending improvement (usually 1 to 2 days).
5. Evacuate if the victim is an infant or small child with severe symptoms.

Getting Help

Important: Provide the following information to Emergency Medical Services personnel: victim’s location, the nature of the medical problem, and condition (stable or unstable).

Corridor Ranger Stations
Ranger stations and medical clinics are staffed year-round at Indian Garden and Phantom Ranch. Cottonwood and Manzanita Ranger Stations are staffed seasonally.
Emergency Phone Locations (auto-connect to 911).
• Bright Angel Trail: Trail Head, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse, Three-Mile Resthouse, Pipe Creek River Resthouse and Bright Angel Campground
• South Kaibab Trail: Trail Head and The Tipoff
• North Kaibab Trail: Cottonwood and Manzanita Ranger Stations
Emergency Phone Numbers: 911 or (928) 638-7911
• Cell Phone: Coverage is sporadic and limited to corridor areas near South Rim on Bright Angel Trail.
• Satellite Phone: Coverage is usually obtainable. Be ready to give information quickly.
Emergency Evacuation
• Go to or send for help if you are close to the rim, river, or a ranger station; you have inadequate food, water, or shelter; you have to way to signal.
• Wait for help to come to you if the rim, river, or ranger station is too far away; food, water, and shelter are adequate; you have means to send a distress signal (signal mirror or ground-to-air radio). Note: Smoky fires are not recommended because they go unnoticed.


Thomas M. Myers, MD
 — A physician at Grand Canyon Clinic since 1990, Tom has treated thousands of canyon visitors and residents. He has devoted much of his medical career to understanding, treating, and preventing medical problems for those who explore the region and is the co-author of the award-winning book, Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon.

© 2020 Grand Canyon Conservancy
Text © 2020 Thomas M. Myers
ALL RIGHT RESERVED.
Printed in the United States of America
Editing: Susan Tasaki Design: David Jenney Design

Photos: Bronze Black, Adam Schallau (cover composite); Randy Prentice (heat illness); Kerrick James (drowning); all other NPS.

Safety is an important concern in all outdoor activities, and users of this pocket guide are fully responsible for their own well-being. This guide is intended to provide general information and guidance with regard to the treatment of injury or illness when professional medical attention is not readily available. The author and publisher disclaim and are in no way responsible or liable for any loss, damage, or disruption caused by the use or misuse of the information contained herein.

Grand Canyon Conservancy
Post Office Box 399,
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023
grandcanyon.org

Grand Canyon: How Not to Die Full Guide

Here is the full guide on how not to die at Grand Canyon, by Thomas M. Myers, MD (author of Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon). Get your own copy now — Click here.

What Can Kill You At Grand Canyon?

(in order of likelihood)

Common Causes
1. Heat Illness
2. Traumatic Falls
3. Drowning
4. Heart Attack
5. Flash Floods
6. Cold Exposure
Less Common/Rare Causes
7. Lightning Strikes
8. Falling Rocks, Tree Limbs
9. Water Intoxication (Hyponatremia)
10. Hantavirus
11. Sacred Datura Poisoning
12. Rattlesnake Bites/Scorpion Stings

Hazards and How to Avoid Them

1. Heat Illness

• Avoid potentially deadly dehydration or heat stroke by not hiking in Grand Canyon during the hottest months of the year (May through September) or the hottest times of day (10 AM to 4 PM).
• Wear a hat and protective clothing; use sunscreen.
• Bring adequate water /rehydration fluid appropriate for the time of year and environmental conditions.
• Drink only when thirsty, and stop when thirst is quenched; do not overdrink (see Water Intoxication).
• Rather than overdrink in hot weather, wet down torso, neck, and head when possible to keep your body cool. A cotton shirt retains water and keeps the skin cooler longer.
• Stop, rest, and eat a salty snack often (15 minutes per hour of strenuous hiking), ideally in the shade.

2. Traumatic Falls

• Stay on trails.
• Avoid exposed cliff areas.
• Do not climb or scramble above your skill level.
• Use hiking poles for better balance and wear instep crampons on seasonally ice trails.
• Stop when tired; fatigue increases trip/fall risk.

3. Drowning

• Swimming in the Colorado River is strongly advised against; hazards include extremely cold water (which can trigger a heart attack of hypothermia), strong currents, and possible rapids.
• Wear a correctly fitted and secured life jacket.
• Do not wade more than knee-deep into the current without a life jacket.
• Exercise caution on river ledges near fast-moving water.

4. Heart Attack

• High elevation, steep trails, and seasonal heat make hiking extremely difficult and physically demanding. Accidental swimming in the cold, turbulent Colorado River (e.g., boat flip or falling out of a boat) is also very strenuous. Both increase the risk of a heart attack.
• Those with known heart disease (prior heart attack, heart surgery) or risk factor (age 50+, smoker, diabetic, high cholesterol, family history of heart disease) should get medical clearance from a cardiologist and a cardiac stress-test before hiking or boating in Grand Canyon.

5. Flash Floods

• Avoid hiking or camping in narrow (“slot”) canyons or drainage bottoms in rainy or wet weather, particularly during monsoon season (late June through mid-September).
• Watch for signs of flash flooding, including creek water turning muddy, water flowing in previously dry washes, a sudden earthy smell in the air, or animals hurrying down-canyon.
• If you hear a loud roar while in a canyon bottom, seek higher ground immediately; a flash flood may becoming.

6. Cold Exposure

• Cold-weather gear is required when hiking/backpacking from November through March.
• For emergencies only, carry fire-starting equipment. Otherwise, fires are prohibited inside the park.

7. Lightning Strikes

• Avoid exposed cliff edges and open spaces during lightning storms.
• Avoid rocky outcrops, lone trees, tall trees, poles, metal railings, and water.
• If in an open space, crouch on the balls of your feet with heels touching; keep your head down and your hands over your ears. Do not lie flat or touch the ground with your hands.

8. Falling Rocks, Tree Limbs

• Pay attention to your surroundings.
• Avoid camping near or under trees with dead limbs, especially in windy weather, or under loose-rock cliff faces, especially in stormy weather.

9. Water Intoxication (Hyponatremia)

• Avoid dangerous drop in blood sodium (dilution of salt) by not overdrinking.
• Drink only when thirsty; stop when thirst is quenched. It is not necessary (and can be dangerous) to drink fixed amounts of fluids at fixed times.
• Eat salty snacks about every 15 minutes per hour of strenuous hiking. (Not eating increases the risk of hyponatremia).
• Excessive or frequent voiding of clear urine is a common sign that you’re drinking more than you need.
• Note that although fatalities are rare, you are ten times more likely to be hospitalized for hyponatremia than for heatstroke.

10. Hantavirus

• Avoid acquiring this deadly lung infection (caused by inhaling the virus often found in deer mouse feces) by not scrambling in caves or old buildings with rodent droppings.
• Avoid kicking up dust in rodent middens.
• Follow up with your doctor if you develop breathing problems, shortness of breath, or a bad cough, even weeks after potential exposure.

11. Sacred Datura Poisoning

• Learn to recognize the plant (large leaves, trumpet-like flowers).
• Don’t handle or consume any part of the plant, especially the seed pod. All parts of the Sacred Datura plant are toxic to the nervous system. As little as one-quarter teaspoon of its seeds may be deadly.

12. Rattlesnake Bites/Scorpion Stings

• Don’t handle these venomous creatures, or attempt to move (or kill) them!
• Shake out your shoes and bedding before use or packing away.
• Don’t stick your hands or feet into places you can’t see.

Medical Emergencies: Stop, Scan, Respond

1. Scan the scene for potential dangers. Do not put yourself or others at risk in order to rescue someone! Make sure the scene is safe before providing assistance.
2. Do a quick assessment. If the victim is unconscious (cannot be roused by painful stimuli) and does not appear to be breathing:
• Call 911 or send for help immediately.
• Carefully roll victim onto back on a flat surface.
• Start chest compressions (“Hands-Only” CPR). For teens and adults, place crossed hands in the center of chest, push down hard, compressing the chest by about one-third its depth at a rate of 100 compressions per minute. Push hard and fast! (For small children, toddlers, and infants, use one hand or fingers.)
• For those trained in providing rescue breathing, give 2 breaths for every 30 compressions.

How to do CPRGood to know
If victim is bleeding severely:
• Cover wound with clean cloth or gauze dressing and apply direct pressure until bleeding stops. If available, wear gloves or improvise with plastic bags.
• Wrap continuously bleeding wounds with a pressure dressing. Avoid wrapping too tightly; if extremity becomes cold, bluish, or numb, or pain worsens, loosen dressing.
• For severe bleeding (spurting blood or limb amputation) that cannot be immediately controlled with direct pressure, apply a tourniquet, which can be improvised from a long and wide (2” to 3”) piece of soft material or a belt.

How to apply a tourniquet
Thomas M. Myers, MD — A physician at Grand Canyon Clinic since 1990, Tom has treated thousands of canyon visitors and residents. He has devoted much of his medical career to understanding, treating, and preventing medical problems for those who explore the region and is the co-author of the award-winning book, Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon.

© 2020 Grand Canyon Conservancy
Text © 2020 Thomas M. Myers
ALL RIGHT RESERVED.
Printed in the United States of America
Editing: Susan Tasaki Design: David Jenney Design

Photos: Bronze Black, Adam Schallau (cover composite); Randy Prentice (heat illness); Kerrick James (drowning); all other NPS.

Safety is an important concern in all outdoor activities, and users of this pocket guide are fully responsible for their own well-being. This guide is intended to provide general information and guidance with regard to the treatment of injury or illness when professional medical attention is not readily available. The author and publisher disclaim and are in no way responsible or liable for any loss, damage, or disruption caused by the use or misuse of the information contained herein.


Grand Canyon Conservancy
Post Office Box 399,
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023
grandcanyon.org