2 girls jumping at the grand canyon

Best Places to Stay at the Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon is perhaps one of the most iconic landmarks in the world – certainly in the United States of America. Set slap bang in the middle of arid Arizona, it is a bucket list destination for almost every self-respecting traveler.

A rare but beautiful landscape, the Grand Canyon spans an awesome 4,926 km². Many people tend to believe that the Grand Canyon is just one specific viewpoint, but how wrong they are. The Grand Canyon is, in fact, a whole national park area that is crisscrossed with hiking trails and bouldering routes galore. That one specific viewpoint, however, is Mather Point.

Welcoming in excess of five million visitors every year, the Grand Canyon National Park is very well set up for the onslaught of eager tourists. There are a hotel, motel and B&B to suit every budget and travel style.

Although the Grand Canyon is Arizona’s most loved landscape, there are a number of other beautiful national parks to explore in the state too. This one is really just the beginning.

Let’s take a look at where to stay in Grand Canyon and where else you can visit in the area.

Grand Canyon Lodge

This North Rim hotel features both basic rooms and cabins, meaning that everyone’s budget can be catered for; some rooms even feature views across the stunning canyon itself. Seasonal events such as outdoor barbecues are held here. The Grand Canyon Lodge also offers free shuttles to the Kaibab trailhead, making it great for hikers. As an added bonus, since children aged 15 and under stay free at this hotel, it’s a very good option for families.

However, this is the only lodge that offers accommodation inside the national park boundaries of the North Rim; therefore, booking a year in advanced is advised. Stay amid the solitude and remoteness in this historic lodge; choose from cabins and lodgings nestled among ancient trees around the canyon edge, and after the day’s hike you can dine in the lodge’s restaurants with magnificent views of the night sky.

Grand Canyon Village – Tusayan

Grand Canyon Village is the most popular place to stay in Grand Canyon and it is not hard to see why. This tiny township has been purpose-built for easy access to the National Park’s main entrance gate. Unless you camp inside the park, you can’t stay any closer than this.

Grand Canyon Village is home to just 2,000 permanent residents, who take great pride in living so close to this national treasure. In the town, you will find Hopi House, an interesting historical landmark well worth a quick visit. The gift shop is one of the best around and offers a wonderful selection of authentic Native American gifts.

By staying in Grand Canyon Village, you are within walking distance of trailheads of some of the National Park’s most famous hikes – Bright Angel Trail, Rim Trail and even Mather Point.

Naturally, no visit would be complete without a visit to the Grand Canyon Visitor’s Centre.

El Tovar – Grand Canyon lodging

El Tovar Grand Canyon first opened for service in 1905. The premier hotel and restaurant at the Grand Canyon were originally operated by the Fred Harvey company. It was designed by Charles Whittlesey (who also designed the Riordan Mansion in Flagstaff, Arizona). The El Tovar has been the most sought after lodging for over 100 years. In 2005, the 100th anniversary was celebrated for this classic historic National Park lodge. It was originally built to accommodate those distinguished passengers who arrived on the Sante Fe Railway. You can make the El Tovar a part of your Grand Canyon vacation if you plan far enough in advance. If you desire to stay at the El Tovar, we recommend that you call Xanterra Parks and Resorts at 1-888-297-2757 at least 13 months in advance. With the exception of January and February, the El Tovar normally books up 13 months in advance.

The El Tovar has 78 rooms. Each one of them is unique and distinctive. Interestingly enough, Charles Whittlesey specifically designed the El Tovar so that you would have to leave your room to enjoy a view of the Grand Canyon.

Tuba City and Moenkopi

These neighboring communities can be found on native Navajo lands about an hour due east of Grand Canyon National Park. Small but welcoming communities that are proud of their heritage ties, Tuba City and Moenkopi are a little off the tourist trail but well worth a visit.

For budget backpackers or road-trippers, Tuba City and Moenkopi are great places to stay in Grand Canyon, as they offer all the facilities you could need and are a gateway to some of Arizona’s best landscapes. The awesome – in the true sense of the word – Antelope Canyon is less than 80-miles north of Tuba City and surely gives Grand Canyon a run for its money.

There are some wonderful family-run diners to explore in Tuba City and Moenkopi. Even out here in rural Arizona, there are all your usual big chain fast-food outlets too, should you fancy something more familiar.

Yavapai Lodge – Grand Canyon lodging

The Yavapai Lodge is located close to a General Store, has a cafeteria-style restaurant, and is within a quarter-mile of the South Rim.

Yavapai Lodge is the largest lodge at Grand Canyon National Park with 358 rooms. It is located adjacent to the Canyon Village Market Plaza, and houses the Guest Registration Desk, Transportation Desk, Gift Shop and the Canyon Café. The entire complex is surrounded by Pinyon and Juniper woodlands, and is a half-mile from the canyon rim. The rooms are often referred to as Yavapai East and Yavapai West. Yavapai is a favorite destination due to the wide range of services available. The Market Plaza includes a general store, deli, bank and U.S. Post Office. The National Park Service Visitor Center is within a short walk — approximately a half-mile. You will also find a coin-operated laundry within walking distance of the lodge.

So, what are you waiting for? Plan and Book Your Trip with Sweetours!

Contact us for further information
Phone: 702.456.9200
Fax – 702.434.7163
Email – info@sweetours.com

sources: thecrazytourist.com, grandcanyon.com, touropia.com

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.